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Addiction Recovery Centre

ARC provides a safe and caring environment for those affected by addiction, drug and alcohol dependency. Our primary focus as a professional team of addiction specialists is to assist and equip individuals with the knowledge and tools required to overcome the horrors of addiction and substance abuse. With a view to healing the body, mind and soul, our residents are given the foundation needed for on-going, wholesome fulfilment and successful living.

DO YOU or A LOVED ONE NEED HELP ?

One of the most important signs of substance addiction or dependence is continued use of drugs or alcohol despite experiencing the serious negative consequences of heavy drug or alcohol use. Often, a person will blame other people or circumstances for his or her problems instead of realizing that the difficulties result from use of drugs or alcohol. For example, your partner may believe he was fired from jobs because his bosses didn't know how to run a business. Or your daughter may believe she got a ticket for driving under the influence of alcohol because the police were targeting her.
Perhaps your loved one has even blamed you. People with this illness really may believe that they drink normally or that "everyone" takes drugs. These false beliefs are called denial, and denial is part of the illness.

Are you feeling a bit overwhelmed ?

Now that your family member is in treatment, things are starting to change. Some of the tension and turmoil that probably were part of your life may be starting to ease. But the first weeks of treatment are stressful. Each family member is adjusting to changes, starting to deal with past conflicts, and establishing new routines. Amid all these changes, it is important that you take good care of yourself - get enough sleep, eat right, rest, exercise, and talk to supportive friends and relatives. Your church, mosque, synagogue, temple, or other spiritual organization also may be a good source of support.
Recovery is not just an adjustment for the person in treatment- it also is an adjustment for you. For the past few years, you may have assumed roles or taken care of tasks that were your loved one's responsibilities. Now, as time passes, you and he or she may need to learn new ways of relating to each other and learn different ways of sharing activities and chores. You may need to adjust your life and family relationships to allow for the extra time this involvement will take.
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I'm Afraid It Wont Work

Treatment is just the first step to recovery. During this process family members sometimes have mixed feelings. You may feel exhausted, angry, relieved, worried, and afraid that, if this doesnt work, nothing will. You may feel as if you are walking on eggshells and that, if you do something wrong, you may cause your loved one to relapse. It is important for you to remember that you cannot cause a relapse; only the person who takes a drug or picks up a drink is responsible for that.

No one can predict whether your family member will recover, or for how long it will, but many people who receive treatment do get better. The longer people stay in treatment the more likely they will remain drug and alcohol free. About half the people who complete treatment for the first time continue to recover. Of course, this means that about half will return to drinking alcohol and using drugs (called relapse) before they finally give them up for good. Adolescents are even more likely to use drugs or alcohol or both again. It is not uncommon for a person to need to go through treatment more than once. Often the person needs to return to treatment quickly to prevent a slip or relapse from leading to a chronic problem

What Happens First

Everyone entering treatment receives a clinical assessment. A complete assessment of an individual is needed to help treatment professionals offer the type of treatment that best suits him or her. The assessment also helps program counsellor's work with the person to design an effective treatment plan Although clinical assessment continues throughout a person's treatment, it starts at or just before a person's admission to a treatment program

The counsellor will invite you, as a family member, to answer questions and express your own concerns as well. Be honest-this is not the time to cover up your loved ones behaviour. The counsellor needs to get a full picture of the problem to plan and help implement the most effective treatment. It is particularly important for the counsellor to know whether your family member has any serious medical problems or whether you suspect that he or she may have an emotional problem. You may feel embarrassed answering some of these questions or have difficulty completing the interview, but remember: the counsellor is there to help you and your loved one. The treatment team uses the information gathered to recommend the best type of treatment. No one type of treatment is right for everyone; to work, the treatment needs to meet your family member's individual needs

What Happens First

Everyone entering treatment receives a clinical assessment. A complete assessment of an individual is needed to help treatment professionals offer the type of treatment that best suits him or her. The assessment also helps program counsellor's work with the person to design an effective treatment plan Although clinical assessment continues throughout a person's treatment, it starts at or just before a person's admission to a treatment program

The counsellor will invite you, as a family member, to answer questions and express your own concerns as well. Be honest-this is not the time to cover up your loved ones behaviour. The counsellor needs to get a full picture of the problem to plan and help implement the most effective treatment. It is particularly important for the counsellor to know whether your family member has any serious medical problems or whether you suspect that he or she may have an emotional problem. You may feel embarrassed answering some of these questions or have difficulty completing the interview, but remember: the counsellor is there to help you and your loved one. The treatment team uses the information gathered to recommend the best type of treatment. No one type of treatment is right for everyone; to work, the treatment needs to meet your family member's individual needs


Q: My father is the one who drinks too much alcohol. Why do the counsellors want to talk to me ?

A: Treatment professionals know that substance use disorders affect the whole family. It makes sense, then, to offer help to the whole family. Some programs offer family education, and others involve the family or couples in counselling sessions. Its hard to grow up with a parent who uses alcohol or drugs. It can be helpful if you learn more about the disease and the effect it has had on your family and on you. Talking to someone who understands substance use disorders can make a big difference for you.

 

Q: What are these "sober life skills" my partner talks about?

 

A: Sober life skills are the new behaviours and ways of living that your partner will need to work on. Before treatment, your partner spent a great deal of time obtaining a substance, using drugs or drinking alcohol, and getting over the substances effects. Most of his or her activities centered on drugs or alcohol. Most of his or her fun activities included drinking alcohol or using drugs, and many of your partners friends used or abused substances, too. For these reasons, people recovering from substance use disorders need to learn a whole new way to live and to make new friends.

 

Q: My husband says that he is an addict. How can this be possible when he still has a good job?

A: Understanding how a person can be dependent on alcohol or drugs and still keep a good job is difficult. The media often portray people with substance use disorders as unemployed, unproductive, criminal, and homeless. However, many people who are dependent on alcohol or drugs do not fit this stereotype; they have jobs and live with their families. The disease does tend to worsen over time. Eventually, your husbands drug use may increase, and, with no help, he may begin to experience more serious problems. The earlier your husband can get treatment, the better chance he has of recovery.

 

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