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Addiction Recovery Centre

your questions

Q: How Long Does Treatment Take?

A: Detox can take from seven days to two months depending on the substance(s) being used. For alcohol and most drugs you should allow seven days - this is usually the minimum a rehab clinic will allow for a detox. Full rehab can take from seven days to 12 weeks including detox. Much depends on patient age and attitude to rehab. We can advise you on the most suitable programme length.

Q: Is longer treatment preferable?

A: Not necessarily. Younger people under 30 tend to need longer than older patients, and the type of programme employed by the clinics determines the ideal length of treatment. We can advise on what is best for you.

Q: Is a rural clinic better than an urban one?

A: Both have their advantages and disadvantages and much depends on the individual. One of our advisors can brief you on which is more suitable for you depending on your situation and requirements.

Q: I keep relapsing after treatment. Can you help?

A: There are many causes of relapse. It is likely that you are going to a clinic that doesnt suit you. It is vital that you fit in with the clinic, the environment and the other patients. Our friendly, highly trained advisors can assess you at no cost and provide a solution.

Q: How do I know that I need inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation?

A: ARC recognizes that each individual who turns to us for help comes with a unique personal history and set of circumstances. We do not assume that everyone who contacts us for care is addicted. Our assessment process provides recommendations and referrals designed to help individuals and families make informed decisions about whether inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation will be the most appropriate step. These recommendations may include residential primary care treatment, outpatient treatment, or referrals to physicians, mental health practitioners, family counselors, or other helping professionals.

Q: Why is it important for someone to enter into an inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation setting ?

A: Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation is usually defined as an intervention stage in the process of arresting an addiction. A person addicted to Alcohol or Drugs may find the process of stopping and staying stopped incredibly difficult. They may also be experiencing a level of denial about the severity of the problem - and the family or people close to the addict may need to intervene. In these cases, inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation is usually the first step in addressing an addicted persons inability to stop using Drugs or Alcohol. For a person that might be experiencing denial about the reality of their behavior and addiction, Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation will usually provide the means and resources to help someone see the reality of their addiction.

Simply put, a Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation facility will offer a person struggling to stop on their own, with the time and resources needed to get the professional help they need to finally break free of their destructive habits. Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation offers the person the opportunity to work with professionals to define blocks to the recovery process and a practical way forward towards overcoming those blocks.

Q: How long should a person stay in an inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation setting ?

A: ARC's goal for each patient is lifelong recovery. As a result, the length of stay in an inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation setting for each patient is determined by the patient's interdisciplinary care team as treatment progresses. For many residential patients, an average length of stay is four to eight weeks, but a longer stay may be recommended if clinically appropriate.

Q: How do I know that I need inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation?

A: ARC recognizes that each individual who turns to us for help comes with a unique personal history and set of circumstances. We do not assume that everyone who contacts us for care is addicted. Our assessment process provides recommendations and referrals designed to help individuals and families make informed decisions about whether inpatient Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation will be the most appropriate step. These recommendations may include residential primary care treatment, outpatient treatment, or referrals to physicians, mental health practitioners, family counselors, or other helping professionals.

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